When I was chatting with one of my friends about weaning she looked at me in horror! I genuinely thought it was ‘normal’ to let babies play with their food. It’s a little like burping isn’t it? You say good boy after each and every burp and celebrate the release of wind but at some point the line blurs and this gesture is no longer acceptable.

Don’t get me wrong when weaning first started I wanted full control of the spoon but when I saw the sheer glee and delight on my little boys face when he delved into his Babymoov bowl and squidged and squeezed the contents and then devoured the contents of his palm (I had only turned my back for a nanosecond). From that point he refused the spoon from me unless I relinquished at least fifty percent of the power.

I loved reading the blog by Babymoov’s chosen nutritionist Julia Wolman who recently answered my queries in my post entitled, Stressless Weaning: The Answers To My Questions  Here’s a little extract of, ‘Mess is Best: Why babies should play with their food!’

This is my son Leo at 8 months. Whilst weaning, my obsessive-compulsive tendencies made me mindful of the clean-up process that lay ahead, on the other hand, the nutritionist in me knew how important it was not to stress about the mess.

All too often I witness babies reaching out to touch a spoon or bowl of food to see and feel what’s in it, whilst the parent ever so quickly retracts it out of their reach. I understand, I have a fear of mess too, and I know it really is so much easier to just steer little hands clear of anything semi-solid. However, when it comes to weaning mess really is best.

Here are five good reasons why it is important for babies to explore (or squish, prod, smear!) their food at mealtimes:

1. It’s fun

2. Learning through sensory play

3. Increasing familiarity

4. Fine motor skills development

5. Hand-eye coordination

Whether using spoons or self-feeding, when babies do it themselves they are learning how to get food into their mouths. And while most of it may go anywhere but their mouth at the beginning, with practice they’ll quickly work it out!

#Messisbest but I must admit that I currently have help from MessyMe to keep it somewhat contained and Bibetta to keep the little fella clothes as clean as possible – read about our experience of these two brands very soon.

 

Tupperware

So then, what do they have in common? They are both brands that we as consumers use on a daily basis to refer to vacuums and plastic containers.

Actually not one hundred percent true. When people used the word Hoover instead of vacuum I would shudder. It was a pet hate of mine but a couple of weeks ago when thinking about how much Tupperware I have in my life a lightening bolt went off in my realisation that I had been in fact been guilty of double standards all of these years (apologies to all those people who have put up with my wrath of branding), Hoover did a fantastic job of getting into the minds of consumers even though Dyson came first.

The featured picture isn’t really a true representation of all of the plastic containers that live in my cupboards but there is always room for more and the children do need their own (don’t they?)

babybowlsWe’ve been testing out these six bowls for £7.99 from Babymoov. Even though there are to help with our #stresslessweaning Emily my six year old decided that the pink and purple bowls were hers and not necessarily for food.

The bowls have a capacity 250 ml (perfect size), a rewritable surface and has an airtight cover.

These bowls came with instructions, I know right, who needs instructions to use the bowls? Ermmm, that appears to be me. After several attempts I simply couldn’t get the lid to make a safe fit so I enlisted the advice of a fellow Babymoov ambassador who instructed to place on in a circle action rather then putting them directly over the bowl and pushing down. Alas this didn’t lead to a perfect seal which is absolutely okay for home use but I may be a little reticent to venture into the picnic bag with any wet items but would use for dry items and hope that I get the lids on well enough not to dispense the contents all over the bag.

These bowls are really easy to get clean and are dishwasher friendly too.

Look out for the next #stresslessweaning #messisbest post which sees us trying the Babymoov lunch set.

 

 

 

Luke weaning

I will be the first to admit it. If I could shy away from weaning Luke I would, if I could setback the crawling a little I would. Yes I want to stop time! The realisation slaps you in the face. They are ready to move on. Try something new, but as a mummy or mammy as you would usually say from the North East of England you, like me might not be ready.

TOUGH now man up and let the weaning begin! In a recent post Breast -vs- Bottle I introduced you to the questions that I asked Julia Wolman RNutr. It was great to speak with Julia as although I love the NHS and them successfully bringing my children into the world when it comes to feeding I have done and still do feel a little lost.

Julia’s educational background includes a BSc (Hons) in Applied Human Nutrition, and a Masters Degree Psychology and Nutrition and is registered with the UK’s Association for Nutrition. With over a decade of experience working with NHS Trusts I love that Julia has delivered training to schools and children’s centres, and running healthy eating projects for local families.

.  But before I give you the answers I just wanted to let you know that Luke FINALLY starts on the ladder at the end of the month but only if he isn’t teething as teething can mimic the effects of an intolerance/allergy (sore bum, little cough, eczema flare, to name a few).

Q. What are the best substitutes for dairy products when weaning?

A. There are more then you might think they include;

Dairy free soya spread, dairy free margarine, dairy free sunflower spread, calcium enriched oat drinks, oat cream made from oats, vegan cheese, soya desserts and tofu for calcium.

Q. His porridge/breakfast cereal tastes disgusting to me as I make it with his milk but will he just be used to it?

A. Luke is used to the taste of his milk but you could try mixing with just water.

Q. Is milk intolerance and lactose intolerance different? (Luke has had no formal testing just observational). 

A. First of all Luke should be tested for a milk/lactose allergy as observation only gives part information. Cow’s milk allergy involves the immune system, babies who are allergic to cow’s milk protein will also show allergy symptoms like an itchy rash, wheezing, or runny noses and coughs. These aren’t seen in lactose intolerance, as this condition doesn’t involve the immune system.

Q. Luke will often accept some food one day and then completely refuse it the next (purse lip and turn his head) is this common and how can I tackle it?

A. It’s really common. Babies will often be happy to try a new taste and even if they pull a face at the first attempt it will be more from surprise more then anything else. Your baby may react differently the next time they experience the same food

You need to persevere. It can often take up to eight attempts for your baby to accept certain foods or tastes, so give them plenty of chances to try again.

But don’t worry is all else fails go back a step to foods with a mild flavor to tempt their taste buds.

Q. I don’t want to rush through stages but I do feel like we are a little behind which may have led to Luke refusing new foods. How can I tackle that?

A. Don’t rush but also don’t miss cues. Your baby may soon stop accepting things from a spoon and this is ok, it’s a sign of independence.

Click here for a further Q and A with Julia Wolman.